For thermal protection the girls use one of the market's most durable and flexible combined work and survival suits – SeaWork from Hansen Protection of Norway.

78 degrees North. 140 km from civilization.

In August 2019 Hilde Fålun Strøm and Sunniva Sørby moved into the remote trapper's hut "Bamsebu", 78 degrees North and 140 km from civilization on the island of Svalbard. As the first women in history, they winter alone in Svalbard, without men. The girls have many projects that will be completed during their 9-month stay that ends in May 2020.

Bamsebu will, among other things, serve as a platform for a global dialogue on climate change in the polar regions. Through satellite communication they have connect and engage scientists, school children, students and other people around the world with monthly discussions and talks on climate change. (Read more about the project here: http://www.exploringbytheseat.com/event/hearts-in-the-ice/ )

In addition, Hilde and Sunniva act as investigative researchers by sending measurements, observations and other data to the Norwegian Polar Institute and the University of Svalbard. They are involved in analyzing the impact of the Gulf Stream on the west coast of Spitsbergen together with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography as well as making observations for NASA.

During the stay new technology is being tested in one of the most extreme environments on earth, both in the fields of solar and wind energy, satellite communications and electric snowmobiles. The girls are also collecting as much plastic waste as they can find in the area and on nearby beaches.

A nine-month stay in one of the world's most extreme environments requires the best equipment. With them on the expedition the girls therefore have one of the market's most durable and flexible combined work and survival suits - SeaWork from Hansen Protection of Norway. The suit is designed and tested to meet SOLA's most stringent thermal exposure protection requirements, thereby ensuring the girls stay dry and safe under the extreme Arctic winter conditions on Svalbard. Hilde and Sunniva say that the suits are crucial to enable them to collect research data and when collecting driftwood and ice samples.

A nine-month stay in one of the world's most extreme environments requires the best equipment.

Produkter i artikkelen

Product added to compare.

Cookies help us improve your experience on our website. So in order to analyze the traffic, offer you personal information and for basic functions to work on the website, we need to use cookies. Read more about how we use cookies